photography tips

5 Beginner Photography Mistakes

Beginner Mistakes Photographers Make (5 things)

1. The first mistake people often make is looking at what other photographers are doing.

First, I want to say that This can actually do some good: Looking at the work of others can be a good way to get inspiration and to raise your standard of what is possible.

So, what’s the problem?

When everyone looks at what other photographers are doing, their work all starts to look the same. This is obviously something you should avoid. Rather, you should find a way to Be authentic: Figure out what you want to say and do it your own way. Find your inspiration where no one else is looking. Do not limit yourself to what your contemporaries are doing.

My recommendation is to Look at the classic masters of photography for inspiration or even completely different genres of art. You might think that the best way to this is by searching online, but the best way to find what you’re looking for is by checking out old books. I recommend hitting your library and used bookstores up. I personally have a secret spot I buy photography books all the time from for as little as 6 dollars

2. The second beginner photography mistake is thinking that gear matters.

If you think better gear will make you a better photographer you’re wrong. If you're thinking ,“I could do this or that that someone else is doing if I just had that lens or whatever, you're making excuses for not shooting. IF ANYTHING limitations make you a better photographer. It forces you to find creative solutions and to work harder.

Back in the day when I had the original Canon 5d, I did not upgrade to the 5dii. I worked with the limitations of the 5d classic and it arguably made me a better photographer. It sucked in low light, so i had to learn clever ways to use my strobes. Its autofocus and burst rate was slow so my timing had to be spot on. By the time the 5diii came out its lowlight performance and focus system was a game changer but to this day I wonder if my timing was better shooting with a 5d original.

The last three examples are all closely related

3. The third mistake photographers make is not respecting the craft.

I’m not just talking about neglecting the technical stuff like shutter speed and aperture. I’m talking about the concepts behind it all so that you’re not memorizing or mimicking set techniques. You should drive toward having a deep understanding of the art form- its past and its historical context.

4. The Fourth mistake people make is not having a photography teacher.

Most people need a teacher. In my experience there are very few who can read a book or watch

youtube and repeat what they’ve learned. I’m not saying you need to go to school or mentor under a photographer, but if you’re not truly able to teach yourself you need a teacher. I did photography all throughout high school and college and to be honest I didn't learn much but at least I had a foundation. Afterward I mostly taught myself, but when I decided to start shooting professionally i didn't have the arrogance to think I knew everything there was to know. Regrettably I started off by shooting weddings as a second shooter and that experience was incredibly valuable. It doesnt matter where you get your education from but if you can't be self taught you need a teacher.

5. The Fifth mistake photographers make lacking life experience.

Without life experience, it can be difficult to make meaningful art.

So:

Go live your life.

Get inspired AND NOT BY LOOKING AT OTHER PEOPLE'S WORK.

Find your voice

Go on a journey! And most importantly...

Introspect!

Watch This if You Want to Take Great Photographs

Read This if You Want to Take Great Photographs

I can not over recommend Read This if You Want to Take Great Photographs by Henry Carrol. I have not found another book on photography with more concise and easy to understand explanations. I think this is a great book for beginners but also a terrific reference book for advanced photographers and photography instructors. Topics discussed include the following: Composition: leading lines landscape or portrait framing foreground interest getting close symmetry the rule of thirds working the frame visual weight breaking the rules Exposure: modes program mode shutter speed and shutter speed priority slow shutter speeds slow shutter speeds at night fast shutter speeds aperture and aperture priority shallow depth of field deep depth of field ISO manual photography exposure compensation AND MUCH MUCH MORE!

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How to Use an External Camera Flash // Part 1: Settings

How to Use an External Camera Flash.

When photographing a wedding, party, or any type of event, You’re not always going to be able to get an exposure with available light. But you’ve probably noticed that on camera flash Well- kind of sucks. Well, It's probably time you upgrade to an external flash

TODAY I'M GOING TO GIVE YOU EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GET STARTED

Personally when I'm using flash my goal is to make it look as little like flash as possible - and in the future, I’m going to give you some tips and tips on how to do so. But before diving into that, We need to talk about your basic settings and how your flash works. Like your camera, your flash has a manual mode. But without an effective means of metering - it can be impractical when on the move at a wedding, event, or anything requiring you to be on the move TTL which stands for through the lens, however, is essentially your flash's automatic mode. The way it works is when you begin to make an image your flash actively meters the light returning to your camera and cuts off once its output enough light to make a proper exposure. But also, like your cameras priority modes, you can tell your flash to either under or over expose an image by varying stops. Remember, your flash doesn't know what it is photographing so it will always expose for middle gray. In my experience when photographing a bunch of guys wearing black suits I set my flash compensation to -1 When I shot weddings, when photographing a bride with flash, I over exposed by about a stop.

That's pretty much all you need to know about your flashs' settings to get started.... But what do you need to know about your camera settings? Well because your flash is essentially shooting in auto - In order to have full creative control over how your images turn out its best to shoot in manual as your flash will adjust to your cameras settings for an exposure. However, It's important to note that flash exposure is solely determined by its output relative to your aperture and ISO alone. NOT shutter speed.

So in short: Set your aperture as you would normally dependent on your needs and taste and your flash will adjust. Shutter speed, on the other hand, while not having an effect on your flash exposure does have an impact on your ambient light exposure. But details on that will have to wait for another video.

I have been a professional photography work for 10 years while teaching photography at the same time. Follow the links below to see my work and be sure to subscribe to my channel on Youtube for more videos

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5 Tips for getting Into Film Photography

Today I have Five tips for those of you just getting into film photography!

5 tips for getting into film photography

 

#1 UNDERSTAND YOUR FUNDAMENTALS

Contrary to what many say, (specifically people who have never taught a photography class) I recommend you understand your photography fundamentals FIRST. Yes, an all manual film camera distills photography down to the basics, but if you’re just learning, not being able to see instant results, not to mention the delay in which you will see your work will slow the process of learning down. And that's not to mention that by the time you see your work, you may forget what your settings and lighting conditions were. If you still want to jump right in, I recommend you get either a point and shoot or any camera with an auto feature. DO NOT LISTEN to people saying you learn best on a manual camera. That sounds good on paper, but in practice getting a blank roll back is a huge disappointment and very off putting. You want to be able to get excited about the process- the technical stuff can come later

#2 START WITH BLACK AND WHITE

Maybe you’ve heard that black and white is more pure and all that- and that may be true. But if you’re just starting out I recommend shooting black and white because you have a greater leeway when it comes to properly exposing your image. Color requires you to be more precise. And while on the topic of Film...

#3 START WITH ISO 400 ISO

400 speed film will give you good amount of flexibility in getting a proper exposure in varying lighting conditions. Sure, it's technically not as “sharp” as a slow speed film, but if you want perfect, you may as well shoot digital.

#4 WHEN IN DOUBT OVER EXPOSE

Film photography is better at preserving the highlights and... When exposing film it’s better to have too much information than too little

#5 TAKE YOUR TIME AND ENJOY THE PROCESS

One of the many reasons to shoot film is because of how enjoyable the hands on process can be and it’s ability to put you in the moment. Never forget that and have fun!

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Advanced Event Photography Tips You've Never Heard

 

Advanced Event Photography Tips You've Never Heard

Pre-select your focal point

Rather than waiting for the viewfinder to reach your eye, consider where the point of focus will be and use your camera’s focus point controller to set it. Keep in mind, this will require you to develop the vision required to conceive your composition prior to seeing what you will see in you viewfinder. With practice this becomes intuitive. You will find yourself automatically adjusting your focus point.

Shoot with both eyes

performer at adobe max


While one eye frames your shot, use your other eye to monitor the action.
Doing so improves your timing as you’re no longer viewing what’s in front of you through the tunnel of your viewfinder. Additionally you are able to monitor the space for other potential images.

Read the room

happy skaters


Follow the energy. This is not hocus pocus. Do not overthink it. Follow the energy for more interesting candids.

Predict smiles

smiling skater

Have you learned to follow the energy? Good. Now it's time to predict a smile.
watch the eyes and anticipate the pause

Time your shot ahead of the peak of action

Your motor skills has a delay. Your camera has a delay from the moment you press the shutter button and the moment it makes an image, albeit small. Experiment with timing your image just before the peak of action to counteract that delay.
 

Nick Offerman at Adobe Max